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Archive for the "Assistive Technology" Topic

Celebrate Global Accessibility Awareness Day

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Today, people from around the world are celebrating Global Accessibility Awareness Day (GAAD), a community-driven effort to raise awareness and discussion about digital accessibility. GAAD was created in 2011 to get people talking, thinking, and learning about the importance of digital accessibility for users with disabilities. GAAD was inspired by a blog post by co-founder Joe Devon, who noticed that web developers were not doing enough to make websites and mobile apps accessible. There are public events to celebrate GAAD in 18 countries on six continents, including 16 in the United States and six in Canada. Even if there is not a… Read More

Accessibility and PDF Table of Contents

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If there is a Bible for PDF accessibility, it is the 14th chapter of ISO 32000_2008, the ur-text of the PDF standard. For any Scripture, of course, there is commentary, and the latest is ISO 14298-1-2016. Nowhere in the core documents defining PDF accessibility is there any complete, definitive description of how to create a table of contents. That is why, when we review PDF tables of contents, there are so many variations in how they are tagged. ISO 32000 describes the tags used to make a table of contents: (From ISO 302000 14.8.2 table 333) TOC (Table of contents)… Read More

Tagging Complex Tables

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Complex Tables are to be avoided at all cost, as I stated in yesterday’s post, The Trouble with Tables: A Brief Introduction. The reason is that they will create 3 to 6 hours of work apiece for authors, developers, or remediators.  I’ve spent a considerable amount of time searching my cache of problematic PDFs, looking for complex tables to use as an example, such as the following: This sure looks like a complex table, and it is – but only due to the author’s desire to attach two separate tables together.  A Section 508 remediator might send this back to the… Read More

The Trouble with Tables: A Brief Introduction

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This is the first in a three-part series of blog posts that is dedicated to the many people in Government agencies who deal with PDF files on a daily basis, and encounter Section 508 requirements for these files. The Federal Government generates tens of thousands of PDF documents annually, and all of these must be made accessible. This task often falls to Section 508 departments, individual remediators, or even content authors. The goal of this blog series is to highlight special issues (and headaches) that you all will encounter. The topics I will be addressing will be based on some of… Read More

Retailers, Take Note: Putting a Price Tag on Lack of Digital Accessibility

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The Click-Away Pound Survey studied online shopping in the United Kingdom by customers with disabilities. The 2016 report revealed some startling numbers: 71% of disabled shoppers will click away from your website if it is too difficult to use. The majority (81%) of these consumers will pay more money for the same item on a competitor’s website if that site is more accessible. These “click-away” customers accounted for around 10% of UK online shopping revenue in 2016—roughly £75 billion in the UK alone. Bringing your websites and apps into compliance with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 is the… Read More

FCC Accessible Communications Regulations – Legal Update Webinar Q & A

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In Tuesday’s webinar, Maria Browne from Davis Wright Tremaine outlined the requirements of the 21st Century Communications & Video Accessibility Act (CVAA), the Communications Act, and their impact on accessibility. This post contains Maria’s responses to audience questions posed during and after the presentation. Webinar Q & A Q: Does the Netflix lawsuit apply only to Netflix-created content or to all content Netflix hosts/shows? //MB: Plaintiffs alleged that Netflix violated Title III of the ADA by failing to provide equal access to its on-demand video streaming website, “Watch Instantly.”  Plaintiffs alleged that Netflix provided closed captioning for only a small percentage of the titles available on its website, and… Read More

Assistive Technology for Users with Mobility Disabilities: Android Switch Access

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Welcome to the final post in this short series on assistive technology for users with mobility disabilities. Today, we focus on Android Switch Access. For the previous posts, please follow these links for “Computer and Mobile Phone Access for People with Mobility Disabilities” and “Assistive Technology for Users with Mobility Disabilities: iOS Switch Control.” Android’s Switch Access (Android 5 and higher) can be used with a variety of Bluetooth switches and Bluetooth keyboards. This accessibility feature allows people with significant motor disabilities to operate the device without using the touchscreen. The Android Switch Access’s purpose is to provide input and access to interactive… Read More

ARIA Widget Checklist: For Screen Reader Testing

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Introduction One of the most significant challenges with ARIA support is determining support level differences between assistive technology and browser combinations, and doing so in a structured manner so that bugs can be accurately and reliably submitted to AT venders so that these support levels can steadily increase equally. However there are still significant discrepancies between valid ARIA usage and what is supported between specific screen readers and browser combinations, so there is immense benefit for such screen reader venders to get on the same page and test these assistive technologies more thoroughly and to also involve the public for… Read More

Assistive Technology for Users with Mobility Disabilities: iOS Switch Control

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The iOS Switch Control accessibility feature is built-in to iOS and can be used with a variety of Bluetooth switches, Bluetooth keyboards, and the iOS device’s screen. This accessibility feature allows people with significant motor disabilities to operate their iOS device. The iOS Switch Control has two modes that the user can use: item scanning and point scanning. Item scanning scans through all the elements on the page. Sometimes elements are grouped together (for example: a drop-down menu), and by selecting the group of elements, the scan mode will drill down and start scanning the individual elements in that group…. Read More

Computer and Mobile Phone Access for People with Mobility Disabilities

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Users with mobility disabilities access computers and mobile phones in an array of ways. These users include people who use wheelchairs, people with limited manual dexterity, and those with limited reach and strength. It is important to note that the baby boomer generation is starting to show age-related disabilities, including but not limited to arthritis, which can make it quite difficult and painful for them to use technology. Today, I’ll offer an introduction to the ways these users access technology, and in future articles I will go into more depth on some of these technologies. To begin, we’ll focus on… Read More

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