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Archive for the "Webinars" Topic

How to Avoid an OCR Complaint

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The Office for Civil Rights (OCR) within the Department of Education (DOE) is responsible for collecting and investigating discrimination complaints at educational institutions. OCR will investigate complaints from every level of education, including colleges and universities. In 2016 alone, OCR received nearly 6,000 complaints on the basis of disability, 600 of which were in the area of digital accessibility alone. This number represents a 55 percent increase in the number of digital accessibility complaints from 2015 and, a 511 percent increase since 2011, when OCR started tracking this kind of complaint. So what sorts of questions should you be asking… Read More

Traveling with Disabilities: Ground Transportation, Hotels, & Entertainment

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In our final installment of this series on digital accessibility for the travel and hospitality industry, we look at ground transportation, hotels, and entertainment. Please click here for Part One and Part Two. Ground Transportation Booking rental cars, taxis, ride shares, trains, and busses come with many of the same difficulties as booking air travel: Websites or apps that do not work with screen readers Important information written on images (and missing alt text) Date picker fields that are not accessible without using a mouse PDF schedules that are not tagged properly Physical accessibility information not listed on the website… Read More

How to Improve Your Accessibility Testing (For Beginners) Webinar Q & A

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In Tuesday’s webinar, SSB BART Group’s Senior Accessibility Consultant Owen Edwards and Accessibility Analyst James Thompson outlined a checklist-based approach to accessibility testing, and examined what details need to be included on setup and testing to ensure consistent, reliable results. This post contains their responses to audience questions posed during and after the presentation. Missed the webinar? No problem! You can access the webinar recording, slides, and CART transcript here: How to Improve Your Accessibility Testing (For Beginners) Webinar Resources. Webinar Q & A Q: How do you adjust your testing methods when reviewing Responsive Web Design websites? // After the initial web test,… Read More

Making Travel Websites Accessible to People with Disabilities

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Travelers with disabilities come across many barriers when planning, booking, and taking a trip, whether for business or pleasure. Some of these may only be minor inconveniences, but others can make travel extremely difficult or even impossible without help. When thinking about disability, organizations think first about those who are blind, deaf, or in a wheelchair. However, it is important to consider the full range of disabilities, including “invisible” ones like colorblindness, arthritis, autism, or dyslexia. These conditions can affect how travelers interact with your websites, mobile apps, kiosks, or other information and communications technology. While the Americans with Disabilities… Read More

Retailers, Take Note: Putting a Price Tag on Lack of Digital Accessibility

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The Click-Away Pound Survey studied online shopping in the United Kingdom by customers with disabilities. The 2016 report revealed some startling numbers: 71% of disabled shoppers will click away from your website if it is too difficult to use. The majority (81%) of these consumers will pay more money for the same item on a competitor’s website if that site is more accessible. These “click-away” customers accounted for around 10% of UK online shopping revenue in 2016—roughly £75 billion in the UK alone. Bringing your websites and apps into compliance with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 is the… Read More

ADA and the Web – What Retailers Need to Know

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Twenty-five years ago, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was signed into law, prohibiting discrimination based on disability. Most retailers understand that physical spaces must conform to specific design requirements for accessibility under the ADA, but in recent years the scope of the law is being interpreted more broadly. The argument has effectively been made that online services constitute “public accommodations.” The Department of Justice’s (DoJ) policy on website accessibility states that Title III of the ADA addresses businesses that are places of public accommodation, and as a result, the effective communication rule applies to entities that use the internet as… Read More

EU Directive 2016/2102/EU: What is Covered?

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European Union Directive 2016/2102/EU, creating a set of standards for EU public sector bodies, was approved on October 26, 2016. But what exactly is covered under the Directive? Let’s talk about what is covered as well as some notable exclusions from the Directive. What is Covered? The Directive applies to websites and mobile applications under the control of public sector bodies. Public sector bodies are defined in the Directive as bodies governed by public law, including State, regional, and local authorities. Public sector bodies also include associations formed by those authorities, if the associations are formed for fulfilling general interest… Read More

The Path to Digital Accessibility for Healthcare Organizations

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Where do you even start when it comes to digital accessibility? It’s often helpful to look at the result and work backward, so let’s look at the results of structured negotiation by a large insurance provider as an example of what accessibility entails. WCAG 2.0 Level AA Standards The organization will consider their web content accessible if it meets the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) version 2.0 Level AA. Their content is tested during production and then monitored regularly to ensure compliance and usability. WCAG 2.0 Level AA concepts include: Ensure that a page is designed so it can be… Read More

EU Directive 2016/2102/EU: The Private Sector

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European Union Directive 2016/2102/EU, creating a set of standards for EU public sector bodies, was approved on October 26, 2016. The Directive explicitly affects public sector bodies, but the private sector may also be impacted by the Directive. The Directive encourages Member States to extend the Directive to private entities that offer facilities and services which are open or provided to the public. Some examples of industries that provide services to the public include: healthcare; childcare; social inclusion; social security; and electronic communication. The Directive also calls attention to services referred to in Directive 2014/25/EU, which creates standardized procurement rules… Read More

Accessibility Legislation in the Healthcare Industry: Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act

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Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability. Section 1557 is not intended to stand alone but works in conjunction with other Federal anti-discrimination and civil rights legislation. Specifically, the law reiterates the prohibitions for discrimination already present in Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990. To that extent, it can be argued that everything covered under Section 1557 is already covered under current laws. We did an extensive series about Section 1557 in late 2016, which… Read More

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